Series Highlights and VBA Cheat Sheet

As we approach the close of the Getting Started with VBA series, it’s important to take a broad look at all topics discussed. This post will act as a reference for general syntax, concepts, and other topics.

Introduction to Custom VBA Classes and Objects

The ability to build classes and custom objects is one of the most valuable, yet underappreciated, features in VBA. While complex and fully functional VBA programs can be created without the use of this feature, utilizing custom objects will permit a VBA programmer to significantly scale-up a project, make it …

Building User-Defined Functions in VBA

While subroutines can be called within other subroutines, their environments are generally segregated — a subroutine cannot directly provide any information to another subroutine. Using functions, however, permits the transfer of a value, array, or object from one procedure to another.

VBA Productivity Tip: Intellisense

This post introduces our first VBA Productivity Tip, a summary of the VBA Editor’s intellisense feature. Intellisense can help reduce the occurrence of common syntactical and semantic errors by providing useful tooltips and lists to help you code more efficiently.

Creating and Using Constants in VBA

A constant is a data structure used to store a specific static value that must be retained through the entire execution of a script. While constants may seem somewhat restrictive, they provide an advantage with memory usage and script readability.

Creating and Using Multi-Dimensional Arrays in VBA

Building upon the one-dimensional array tutorial, multi-dimensional arrays provide an opportunity to easily create or transfer large tables of data. In many instances, thousands of data points can be created with a few simple lines of code. Note: multi-dimensional arrays can be inefficient and difficult to manage for complex sets …

Using Conditional Statements in VBA

Previous posts on the Getting Started with VBA Series have focused on how to both extract information from cells on the spreadsheet, and create information in VBA with variables. While these may meet the needs of some simple programs, conditional statements open the door to creating responsive programs.

String and Numeric Functions

You are likely already familiar with many functions–such as ROUND or TRIM–that can be applied to cell values within a worksheet. VBA also contains a number of string and numeric functions that can be applied to variables.

Overview of Methods and Properties of the Range Object

When coding in VBA, the range object offers a means to fully interact with cells on a spreadsheet. This is done through its object methods and properties — nearly every action undertaken in the Excel interface has a equivalent method or property in VBA.